Shortcode display and examples

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Application Form

Please fill out the form below to continue Online Form - First State Fabrication Employment Form #2

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Canopies

When you need a canopy designed, you want it done right. We are industry leaders in fabrication so we make sure our canopies are nothing less than extraordinary.  With several types to choose from, we have canopies that will fit...

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Easy columns

this is column 1
this is column 2

float left

float right

clear fix so it doesn't mess with layout

Another version of social generation

button shortcode: button title

Tab 1 content
tab 2 content

Toggle content

Testing display of HTML elements

This is 2nd level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 3rd level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 4th level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 5th level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 6th level heading

This is a test paragraph.

Basic block level elements

This is a normal paragraph (p element). To add some length to it, let us mention that this page was primarily written for testing the effect of user style sheets. You can use it for various other purposes as well, like just checking how your browser displays various HTML elements by default. It can also be useful when testing conversions from HTML format to other formats, since some elements can go wrong then.

This is another paragraph. I think it needs to be added that the set of elements tested is not exhaustive in any sense. I have selected those elements for which it can make sense to write user style sheet rules, in my opionion.

This is a div element. Authors may use such elements instead of paragraph markup for various reasons. (End of div.)

This is a block quotation containing a single paragraph. Well, not quite, since this is not really quoted text, but I hope you understand the point. After all, this page does not use HTML markup very normally anyway.

John Doe, johndoe@fake.address

Lists

This is a paragraph before an unnumbered list (ul). Note that the spacing between a paragraph and a list before or after that is hard to tune in a user style sheet. You can't guess which paragraphs are logically related to a list, e.g. as a "list header".

  • One.
  • Two.
  • Three. Well, probably this list item should be longer. Note that for short items lists look better if they are compactly presented, whereas for long items, it would be better to have more vertical spacing between items.
  • Four. This is the last item in this list. Let us terminate the list now without making any more fuss about it.

This is a paragraph before a numbered list (ol). Note that the spacing between a paragraph and a list before or after that is hard to tune in a user style sheet. You can't guess which paragraphs are logically related to a list, e.g. as a "list header".

  1. One.
  2. Two.
  3. Three. Well, probably this list item should be longer. Note that if items are short, lists look better if they are compactly presented, whereas for long items, it would be better to have more vertical spacing between items.
  4. Four. This is the last item in this list. Let us terminate the list now without making any more fuss about it.

Links

This is a text paragraph that contains some inline links. Generally, inline links (as opposite to e.g. links lists) are problematic from the usability perspective, but they may have use as “incidental”, less relevant links. See the document Links Want To Be Links.

2 test acf field

checking test acf field